What is Sacred Geometry? Learn all about the beauty of sacred geometry | Gallery Drinkware (Formerly Water Gallery)

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What is sacred geometry?

Water Gallery, glass water bottle, Metatron's Cube, Drew Brophy, sacred geometry, sacred geometry art

We are so excited to be releasing four new Water Gallery glass water bottle images in the next couple of months, two from each of our new artists, marine wildlife artist Guy Harvey and surf lifestyle painter Drew Brophy. Among the four works of art we are thrilled to feature is Drew Brophy's "Metatron's Cube," as seen in the image above. Drew Brophy paints some of the most stunning works of sacred geometry that we've ever seen and his portrayal of "Metatron's Cube" is a prime example.

So, we mentioned this thing called "sacred geometry"...it catches the eye and sparks interest, absolutely. All the repeating shapes and incredible colors are so unique and intriguing. And wow, Drew Brophy's skill level is out of this world. All of that is undeniable. But you may be wondering, what is sacred geometry and what's the meaning behind it?

For those of us who love the natural world, from a particular flower to a bee's honeycomb to a seashell to a snowflake or even a simple green leaf, you have most likely noticed that there are geometric shapes and repeating patterns all around us which occur naturally in the environment. These are representations of sacred geometry.

sacred geometry in a sea shell

 sacred geometry in a honeycomb

Take, for example, the honeycomb pictured above: notice how the honeybees construct hexagonal cells to hold their honey. This is a natural instinct for the bees, to build these repeating shapes and form a pattern and this is an example of sacred geometry in nature. Nature is constructed with a geometric plan, lending a beauty and satisfaction to the eye, not to mention a functionality. The shapes themselves accommodate nature's growth so it can expand and develop unhindered as the pattern repeats itself. It makes sense that an artist would want to capture and reproduce these geometric shapes in a dynamic and colorful way.

There are both mathematical and religious theories relating to sacred geometry. One does not have to hold any particular religious convictions in order to appreciate and admire sacred geometry; one does not have to believe in any specific God or higher being(s) to see the aesthetic beauty of sacred geometry. Its allure is to be acknowledged and valued by all, regardless of one's religious convictions or lack thereof. That said, it's important to understand the origins of sacred geometry in both a secular and religious point of view. In terms of mathematics in nature, for example, one can see sacred geometry as things grow in a "logarithmic spiral," or an ever-growing curve that originates from one center point. With this geometric pattern, growth can be accommodated without having to halt and change shape. Evidence can be seen commonly in shells, like the chambered nautilus. Sacred geometry is believed to be at work here, as geometric shapes organically occur in nature, enhancing the beauty and "magic" of the natural environment around us.

In terms of religion, there is a long-held belief that God created the universe according to geometric plan. The great philosopher Plato famously said, "God geometrizes continually." Sacred geometry is used in the construction of many religious structures, ranging from places of Christian, Jewish, and Muslim worship-- churches, temples, mosques, altars, monuments, holy wells, and religious art of all sorts. Geometric figures were also employed in many forms of ancient architecture, including those of ancient Egypt, Greece, and Rome.

sacred geometry, mosque

sacred geometry, church

Drew Brophy's attachment to sacred geometry focuses largely on the connectedness theory behind it, the belief that energy flows between art, nature, science, and mathematics as well as between all of us as human beings. His life's work has been dedicated to his surf lifestyle art and while he continues to embrace his identity as the "Son of the Sea," more and more he is drawn to the allure of sacred geometry. He says, "my new art has changed to reflect my intense studies of unified field theory and the idea that everything is a vibration and we are all connected."

Water Gallery is so proud to start offering glass water bottles showcasing the incredible art of Drew Brophy. The beauty of his sacred geometric work is unmatched, in our view. And in the coming months, shortly following the release of these new bottles, we have some exciting additional products that we are going to launch, including some spectacular new glass drinkware that will showcase sacred geometry in ways that you've never seen before. Stayed tuned for more information and announcements!

 

 

 

2 comments

Feb 09, 2016 • Posted by Brittany

I think this is a beautiful piece. Would like to purchase a big painting of the sacred geometry.

Oct 06, 2015 • Posted by Orla Donlyn

Gotta love nature inspired art, never seen this before but looks great.

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